Defining Our Terms: Who Is “the Investor Class”?

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Theorists who study classes—whether they are economic, social, or political classes—have to be particular about the definitions and assumptions that inform their work. Without getting on the same page first, phrases like “middle class” would tell us practically nothing (except that maybe members are above some lower class and below some upper class?). 

We’ve recently been reminded of a term that’s now a few decades old: people talk about “the investor class,” or the group that has access to and takes advantage of stock ownership. 

In the past, the push to grow this “class” had political motivations. (The thinking went that if more of the electorate participated in the stock market, those voters would develop a new appreciation for certain policy goals regarding wealth and business.) 

So what defines this group, today? Who is “the investor class”? 

We can’t speak for all shops, but we already know who our clients. The portion of the “investor class” we work with is made up of, well, retirees and workers and truck drivers and executives and nurses and engineers and young teachers and former teachers and accountants and statisticians. 

They are married couples and widows and single people. They live in the Midwest and outside the Midwest. 

Some went to college. Some went beyond college. Some are high school graduates.  

Some start their investment journey with traditional pension plan contributions. Some start later in life when a sudden windfall arrives. 

Some like saving. Some like spending. 

At first glance, this may seem to be a poorly defined group. But hey… we’re talking about the work of growing your buckets, not anthropology or sociology. 

One characteristic does give structure to our definition of “the investor class”this group’s members are those people in the best position to profit from it over the long haul. In this niche market of the mind, we share a desire to own a piece of the action, in the form of shares of common stock, from nearly all sectors of the economy.  

Interested in this special but not-so-exclusive club? The barriers for entry have never been lower, and we’re glad to try to help anybody who wants to be here.  

Let’s talk: please email us or call. 


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