Month: March 2018

Change is Still Constant


We wrestled for a long time with the issue of how to build portfolios in a zero-interest environment. The crushing of interest rates distorted values in the investment markets. The old ways of thinking carried too much risk, in our opinion. (When interest rates rise, bond prices tend to fall.)

So about a year ago, we settled on the concept of ballast. This enables us to tailor portfolios to address individual preferences. Different clients can have differing portfolios, while retaining common elements that enable efficient management.

Ballast refers to holdings that might be expected to fall and rise more slowly than the overall stock market. Ballast may reduce the volatility of the overall portfolio, thereby making it easier to live with. And it may serve as a source of funds for buying bargains when the market seems to be low. We’ve been able to put this thinking into effect.

A little over a year ago, monetary policy in the U.S. shifted from zero interest to a plan to raise interest rates over time. As we foresaw, this has not been great for bond prices. But now U.S. Treasury securities actually have a little bit of a yield these days, with short term maturities recently reaching over 1% for the first time in years.1

The return of interest rates on lower volatility, short term, liquid balances makes it easier to hold cash and cash substitutes as part of a portfolio structure. As interest rates continue to normalize, returns on cash could increase.

We like the portfolio framework, shown above, that we developed a year ago. We will continue to assess clients that may be suitable for this strategy. As the economic environment changes, we will review the need to adjust the tactics used in each layer of the portfolio. Change is still constant.

We will update you soon on the trends we are seeing in our long term core investments. Clients, if you would like to talk about this or anything else, please email us or call.

1Effective Federal Funds Rate. Federal Reserve Economic Data, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis. Accessed March 2018.

The opinions voiced in this material are for general information only and are not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual. All performance referenced is historical and is no guarantee of future results.

All investing involves risk including loss of principal. No strategy assures success or protects against loss.

Bonds are subject to market and interest rate risk if sold prior to maturity. Bond values will decline as interest rates rise and bonds are subject to availability and change in price.

Tactical allocation may involve more frequent buying and selling of assets and will tend to generate higher transaction cost. Investors should consider the tax consequences of moving positions more frequently.

Enduring Value

© Can Stock Photo / EpicStockMedia

We think a lot about how to make things last. It is a key concept for your assets, our relationships, and the securities in which we invest.

But our enterprise here at 228 Main has to endure so we may continue to be of service. We therefore work diligently on its sustainability.

Thinker Morgan Housel wrote about the sources of sustainability in business. Relative to the competition, these attributes provide an enduring competitive advantage:

1. Learn faster.

2. Empathize more with your customers.

3. Communicate more effectively.

4. Be more patient.

These things resonated with us because they represent much of what we strive for. Patience is a prerequisite of successful investing. It is free, but not easy to practice. It also is what lets us be content to work with you at your pace, on your schedule, since we are talking about your money.

You know by now how highly we value effective communication! Listening to you and talking to you in various ways is one of our three core activities. We put a lot of effort into it.

Empathy—understanding what you are going through, where you want to go—is perhaps the key to being able to meet your needs.

We are surprised at how much we are still learning after so many years of experience. In this rapidly changing world, continuous learning is required in order to be able to survive and thrive.

Clients, we are not claiming perfection in any of this. But we are mindful of the things we must do in order to be a reliable partner for you through the years. If you would like to talk about this or anything else, please email us or call.

We Are All Globalists

© Can Stock Photo / lucidwaters

Global trade and international relations have dominated the news lately. The president signed a pair of sweeping tariff proclamations and issued a number of statements about trade.

Each of us has been mostly free to buy the goods and services we choose, regardless of origin. Chanel, Honda, Burberry, Adida, Mercedes Benz, Nestle, Armani, Samsung, Phillips, LG, Toyota, AXA, Bayer…these global brands earned their position because enough of us voted for them with our wallets.

If you are of a certain age, you remember when ‘fruits and vegetables’ meant about a dozen things. Now the produce section features products from dozens of countries.

Trade is not a one way street, either. Within forty miles of beautiful downtown Louisville, the small town of Valley Nebraska hosts Valmont. The company began in the irrigation equipment business in 1946. Today Valmont does business in one hundred countries on six continents.

Likewise, the farms surrounding these towns help feed the people of many nations.

Many of the most iconic American companies like Caterpillar and Boeing produce for the whole world, too. As with those international brands, they earned their position by being valuable to their customers.

We could buy Fords instead of Toyotas. And people in other lands could buy Kubotas instead of Caterpillars. But what would be the point? The U.S. and the whole world has steadily gotten wealthier and more prosperous by doing business in a relatively free system of global trade.

Because citizens of each country may or may not choose to buy and sell equal amounts to other countries, so-called trade deficits result. You have a trade deficit with the grocery store—week after week, you are in there buying things. Yet the grocery store never buys anything from you. This is not a problem, is it?

Trade has made us richer and our lives better. Less trade will make us poorer and life more difficult. (A trade war and collapse of trade was at the heart of the Great Depression, after all.) We are watching current developments carefully.

Clients, if you would like to talk about this or anything else, please email us or call.

Win, Win, Win

© Can Stock Photo / kk5hy

Remember ‘win-win thinking?’ This phrase became popular in business a long time ago to describe interactions in which everybody comes out better. Our favorite example is as familiar as the grocery store. The grocer wants your money more than he wants the can of beans. You want the beans more than you want the money. A trade is made; everybody wins.

“Win-Win” is a fair description of how our business works. In our investment advisory accounts offered through LPL Financial, we are compensated by a percentage fee on account value. Our best path to growing revenues is growing account values. When you do better, we do better.

In the old brokerage model, products are sold to investors for a one-time commission. We think of this as the Good Luck plan, because the salesmen get paid up front and can wish you good luck, as they head down the road to find another prospect. They have no skin in the game, so to speak.

This does make sense in some situations. If you know what you want and do not plan on trading it, the one-time commission model probably works well for you. In a brokerage account, after you pay the sales charge you can hold on to your investment without paying ongoing management fees as you would in an advisory account.

However, we are in the business of trying to figure out how to grow your bucket, which often involves many trades over the course of a year. This creates a conflict for us: the more we trade in a brokerage account, the more commission charges add up, which is great for us but not for you. But our advisory accounts do not pay us on commission. When we switched to focus on advisory business, your interests and ours became much more closely aligned: we were free to make trades we believed would help you without worrying about commission costs. Life got simpler for us and better for you, we believe.

Win-win thinking also led us to introduce longevity discounts to our fee schedule. The longer we are in business with you, the better we understand each other. Longer time horizons and longer relationships are good for you and good for us. Another win-win deal.

It runs deep. From time to time we find that a client is paying for advice which they do not care to follow. This is win-lose, not win-win. We endeavor to get out of these situations as soon as we figure them out.

The biggest advantage of win-win thinking is that all of our energy can be devoted to striving to improve your situation. Relief from worrying about our position is quite liberating. Clients, if you would like to talk about this or anything else, please email us or call.

The opinions voiced in this material are for general information only and are not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual.

All investing involves risk including loss of principal. No strategy assures success or protects against loss.

Rebalancing a portfolio may cause investors to incur tax liabilities and/or transaction costs.