enjoying life

We’re in the Orchard for the Fruit Crop

The idea of an orchard is useful in illustrating some of the basic concepts we use in investing and planning. (The metaphor is even among our greatest hits on the blog!) Orchards are long-term endeavors. The payoff from planting trees now arrives years in the future—not unlike retirement contributions.

During our working years, we tend to focus on our account balances—the value of our orchard, so to speak. But in retirement, the key factor is probably the size of the fruit crop, not the value of the orchard. We pay our bills in retirement with monthly cash flow from our accounts, not the statement value.

After all those years of watching the value of the orchard, this is a big shift in thinking. In our working years, the fruit of the orchard goes to plant more trees. When we retire, it is okay to live on the fruit crop.

Further, if we are living on the fruit crop, it doesn’t matter what the neighbor would pay for the orchard, or if the latest offer is higher or lower than the one before. The orchard is not for sale. This is the same way an investment portfolio works. Regular cash flow can come out, even as statement values go up and down.

We were reminded of this story recently, in working with retired clients who are considering a change in lifestyle. Their idea will take a lump sum of capital, plus an increase to their monthly expenses. They wondered whether their financial security would be impaired by the outlays.

The answer for them: the size of the remaining orchard should easily provide a fruit crop large enough to meet expenses. And in retirement, there is no compelling reason to plant more trees every year, to continually reinvest the fruit crop. It is okay to live on the fruit crop—and leave the orchard for the kids.

Clients, if you would like to talk about your orchard, please email us or call.


Want content like this in your inbox each week? Leave your email here.

Play the audio version of this post below:

We're in the Orchard for the Fruit Crop 228Main.com Presents: The Best of Leibman Financial Services

This text is available at https://www.228Main.com/.

Letters to Our Children #2: The Journey

canstockphoto4993676

This project is rewarding, from our perspective. We are crowd-sourcing the topics for these letters to our children about money and life. Your response has been terrific.

A wise person among you suggested ‘enjoy the journey’ is key. It makes sense to talk about this early in our series, since it has everything to do with how we go about life. The implication is that the journey, not the destination, is the important part.

When you think about it, arrival at a destination (or achievement of a goal) is a temporary thing. Once the goal or destination is reached, you’re there. Then what? A new goal, a new destination. We spend far more of our days on the way than in actually arriving.

In financial terms, the satisfaction of saving something every payday is a way to enjoy the journey. The destination, perhaps a pot of wealth big enough to retire on, is a long way off during the early and middle phases of your career. It is hard to focus on a destination that may be decades away. It’s much easier to get in the habit of enjoying small steps along the way – the journey.

Recently, in the security screening line at the airport, a fellow traveler in an adjacent line loudly inquired why the conveyer belt on the baggage scanner up ahead was stopped. The identification checker replied they did not know. “Well, don’t you think you better go find out?” Of course, the belt frequently stops when additional scrutiny of an item is needed.

The traveler immediately in front of me got to the identification checker, who asked “How are you today?” The fellow quietly replied, “Terrific. I’m grateful I’m not THAT guy,” nodding toward the foot-tapping, sighing, unhappy person. All within earshot were smiling; the dyspeptic was unconscious of his role in the conversation.

This vignette is a case study in literally enjoying the journey—or not. It’s about making the most of where you are, what you are doing, who you are with.

Our focus in this series will be more on the process, the getting there, the journey, not checklists of goals one ‘should’ accomplish. We believe this is the happier path.

If you have questions about this or anything else, or more topic suggestions for this series, please email us or call.