esg investing

The Good-Enough Place

photo shows two rocks balancing in opposition on other rocks on a beach

Clients, in our latest round of portfolio reviews, we’ve been getting into the nitty-gritty with many of you. There are changes we’re suggesting, but we’re also doing a fair amount of listening.

Our recent research endeavor into ESG—those investments that meet particular criteria for addressing environmental, social, and (corporate) governance issues—has deepened many of our conversations.

We’ve written about how ESG investing is harmonious with our focus on the long term, and whatever you call these styles, we’re interested: we want our practices to be more sustainable, more consciously capitalist, more socially responsible… You get the picture.

So what are we learning in our efforts to be more intentional? Well, that doing good may mean taking the time to define what “good” is. Every human endeavor comes bearing flaws, but how do we minimize harm and maximize long-lasting good?

The hit show The Good Place keeps coming to mind in these conversations. It’s an exploration of the afterlife, asking some hilarious questions about the meaning of life’s choices.

When things get dicey even for those who are “designing” the afterlife, Ted Danson’s character puts it this way: “Life now is so complicated, it’s impossible for anyone to be good enough… these days just buying a tomato at a grocery store means that you are unwittingly supporting toxic pesticides, exploiting labor, contributing to global warming. Humans think that they’re making one choice, but they’re actually making dozens of choices they don’t even know they’re making.”

Yikes, right? But just like the characters in this show, we’re trying to come at this with a lighter, more human approach. Given the costs of our choices, which do enough good to counter the cost? Which costs can we live with?

Big questions, important topics. Clients—let’s keep talking. When you want to know what this might mean for your portfolio, write or call.

(For a little levity, Maya Rudolph’s character replies to the speech above: “That’s your big revelation? That life is complicated? That’s not a revelation. That’s a divorced woman’s throw pillow.” The show is worth a watch.)


Environmental Social Governance (ESG) investing has certain risks based on the fact that the criteria excludes securities of certain issuers for non-financial reasons and, therefore, investors may forgo some market opportunities and the universe of investments available will be smaller.


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ESG & You: Investing in Worthy Ways

photo shows sun shining through tree branches

We’re all about the long term at 228 Main. And we’re interested in companies that are oriented to the long term… like the ones trying to take care of the environment, operating in ways that are sustainable for employees and clients and suppliers, removing barriers to entry—these are all long-term processes.

And in our opinion, we believe companies like this happen to do better, too.

Maybe you’ve heard about ESG investing—the practice of putting money into those investments that address environmental, social, and governance issues.

We’re not interested in fads, but this style is all about the long term.

Any human endeavor will have its flaws, but we’re figuring out how to bring the best qualities of ESG into our work with you.

First, we can keep certain kinds of companies off our buy list. Those businesses that deal in tobacco, alcohol, and gambling, for example, don’t align with many people’s beliefs about individual wellbeing.

Second, we can add certain companies that meet sustainability criteria, like environmental benchmarks or diversity among corporate leadership.

Trying to grow your bucket is always at the heart of our work. But we shouldn’t have to choose between performance and other worthy results. Let us know if ESG goals are a priority for you.


Environmental Social Governance (ESG) investing has certain risks based on the fact that the criteria excludes securities of certain issuers for non-financial reasons and, therefore, investors may forgo some market opportunities and the universe of investments available will be smaller.


Want content like this in your inbox each week? Leave your email here.