consumer preferences

The “Stuff” of Wealth

photo shows clothing hanging and a table full of glassware and kitchen goods for sale at a yard sale

Spring cleaning has given way to garage sale season in many communities. What a thrill for the senses! Whole rooms, stages of life, and past eras get arranged outside for our neighbors to consider.

I myself lean more minimalist, in general. Less stuff means less to manage. But having moved a few times in a few years, I’m thinking more about our relationship to the stuff our lives—and what it might highlight about our wealth more generally.

Maybe you’ve read about or seen the Netflix show from Marie Kondo: she’s a Japanese “tidying expert.” In her method, people have to confront their relationship with things they keep.

Does each item spark something in you? Does each item have a home?

The spark is typically joy or energy, but it could be a basic appreciation. (I wouldn’t say my toilet brush “sparks joy,” but hey, I’m glad enough I own one for when I need it!)

There are no formulas about what fraction of your wealth you devote to the stuff of your life, from furnishings and clothes to gadgets and books and fine art and gardening tools and… whatever it might be. You might, however, think about whether there’s a fit between what you have and the life you’re living. Does anything feel like it doesn’t fit? Do you get the sense something’s missing?

Our stuff is not the most important part of our financial planning, but it can certainly be part of it. As you look around at the things of your life, we hope that you see them as a reflection of and tool toward your goals—as part of a happier, healthier, and more sustainable financial future.

Think of it from the other direction: if you’ve got stuff around that’s not really part of your life, you’re paying for it to live rent-free with you! (How’s that for crystalizing the financial cost of keeping stuff around?)

Clients, no judgments from us: when you’re ready to talk about how we can help realign your money with your life, write or call.


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Building a Faster Horse

canstockphoto15211

There is a quotation often attributed to Henry Ford: “If I had asked people what they wanted, they would have said faster horses.”

Biographers and historians have never managed to find any evidence that Ford ever uttered this statement, so it remains apocryphal. But the sentiment remains true to Ford’s reputation as a stubborn visionary.

For investors as well as consumers, sometimes there is a difference between what we need and what we want. We all want stability in our portfolios: why not? But stability often comes at a cost of lower income or growth potential. If you are sure you have all the money you will ever need, it makes sense to invest for stability. If you need your money to work for you, though, you may have to hold your nose and accept volatility.

If you really want stability, you can bury your money in a hole in the backyard. It will never grow, but you know that if you dig it back up you will still have what you put in.

The same is not true if you invest in volatile holdings. The value of your portfolio can and certainly will go down sometimes. As painful as that is, if you can afford to wait there is a possibility that it may recover over the long run.

If you just buried your cash in the backyard, there is no chance that it will suddenly produce more wealth. A long time horizon can smooth out the risks of a higher volatility portfolio, but it will not produce more gains from a more stable portfolio.

If we asked new prospects what they wanted, many would probably say they wanted stability. But that is not what we are selling. Not everyone has the same risk tolerance, and different amounts of volatility are appropriate depending on financial circumstances. We still generally think that learning to tolerate volatility may be more useful than seeking stability at all costs.

Clients, if you have anything to discuss, please call or email us.


The opinions voiced in this material are for general information only and are not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual.

All investing involves risk including loss of principal. No strategy assures success or protects against loss.