portfolio review

Reviewing the Essentials: What’s in the Kit?

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I’m in my line of work to talk all day. I love spending time getting to know you, getting down to the essence of your financial situation. With new clients, it’s a bit like jumping on the train with you and asking, “So where are we headed?”

Clients, you know it takes some trust and some time to get down to the essence of your situation. And the exciting thing is that the essentials can change on us.

“Wait, wait, wait,” you might be wondering, “Aren’t the essentials essential for a reason?” Yes. The fundamentals are always in style… but the circumstances can (and do!) change. And so we revisit our systems, our assumptions, and our resources.

Any seasoned traveler will recognize the ways “the essentials” can shift over time. Taking inventory of first-aid kit, for instance, you notice that some supplies can expire, wear out, or become obsolete as your life and your activities change.

So it goes with the companies we screen, too. As we search for potential investment opportunities, some of our favorite qualities help us identify what resonates with us. But a bargain doesn’t keep its bargain status forever: that label is useful to us, but we actively monitor our holdings as things change.

It’s a dynamic line of work we’re in. There is no “set it and forget it,” really. We’re all about the fundamentals, those values that guide us, but keeping our practice geared on the essentials—and only the essentials—is quite an active process.

And a lot of fun for us, to boot.

Clients, what are we missing? Is it time to take a closer look at something together? Write or call, anytime.


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Reviewing the Essentials: What’s in the Kit? 228Main.com Presents: The Best of Leibman Financial Services

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Feeling the Burn and Staying Fresh: One Sneaky Benefit of Stress

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My reading habits, always eclectic, have gotten a lot of exercise during the pandemic. I just read about an interesting health phenomenon, one that illuminates the things we like to talk about here. 

“Autophagy” is the body’s way of recycling older or damaged cells and doing cleanup and maintenance. It seems to promote regeneration of new, healthy cells. The stresses of physical exertion and fasting are known to trigger increased autophagy, a sort of survival mechanism. 

What could this possibly have to do with investing? 

We recently chose to take advantage of a volatile day in the stock market to clear out a few holdings. It was cleanup and maintenance. Those sales freed up money with which to invest in newer ideas and opportunities.  

Just as stresses trigger autophagy in the body, market volatility and economic change tend to trigger cleanup and maintenance in our portfolios. 

Autophagy is believed by some to be a sort of an anti-aging process, keeping the body younger. Likewise, with our portfolio management, we strive to keep our holdings fresher, more in tune with the times. “In shape.” (No guarantees, of course. Autophagy does not guarantee perpetual youth, and our work does not guarantee returns.) 

When you are ready to talk about the health of your portfolio, call or email us. Let’s talk.


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Stagnation

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The word stagnant is an adjective used to describe things that are motionless, lifeless, lethargic, slow-moving, inactive or static, like water with no flow to it.

If these kinds of words also describe financial accounts you own, this may be a good time to get things moving. A dormant old 401(k) or too much cash parked in the bank could be in that category. Investments or advisors you don’t understand might be another sign.

A wise person once said that every past market crash looks like an opportunity. We do not have to wait until after the inevitable rebound to treat the current turmoil as an opportunity. It could be a great time to do something about the stagnant pieces of your financial puzzle. Or not. No guarantees.

(We address our communications to clients, but know that we have many eavesdroppers. To them we say, our approach is not for everyone. You can learn a lot about it here at 228Main.com, or in our Twitter or LinkedIn feeds.)

You may need to clean house in your finances or review your plans and planning in light of new information. If we might be able to help, put us to work. It’s what we do.

Clients, if you would like to talk about this or anything else, please email us or call.