bargain hunting

Can One Redeem All?

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As value investors, we have always treasured the opportunity to buy shares at favorable prices for companies we deem to be durable. For many companies, 10 times the annual earnings per share looks like a bargain to us!  

In the recent market turmoil, these kinds of opportunities appeared again. The arithmetic of these situations is interesting: an investment might compound to three times its beginning value over 10 years or so if the company is making annual profits of one-tenth the share price and earnings keep up. 

No guarantees, of course. We could be wrong in our judgment, or some problem could befall the company and upset the theory.  

But suppose shares are purchased in three such companies. If only one pans out as hoped over the 10 years or so, it may be worth triple the beginning value. If the other two are worth nothing, then the combined value of the three may still hover around the original value, as it was 10 years before.  

One could redeem all. 

Better yet, a company that delivers steady earnings over 10 years might be valued at 15 or 20 times earnings in the future instead of just 10 times, based on the steady earnings record. That valuation change might produce profits in addition to return of the original investment. 

Well-known grocery chains, health companies, and food processors may be a fit for this strategy. We cannot know the future, but we believe all these companies will survive—not just one out of three—with the possibility of real gains.  

But even if only one proves durable, that one may redeem all. 

If you are ready to talk strategy as it relates to your goals, please email us or call.


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Portfolio Themes: December 2020

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Our investment research process is bottom-up: we look first at individual companies, screening for bargains and dividends, checking out ideas, reading SEC filings and news reports.

But certain themes do tend to emerge, as favorable opportunities often cluster in one industry or sector.

Thinking about the big picture, it seems to us that inflation may surprise on the upside in the months and years ahead. The COVID-19 pandemic—suppressing activity on a global basis—may give way to a synchronized global recovery. With not enough production capacity attempting to supply material and goods through a transportation network constrained by the crisis, shortages may lead to higher prices.

Record tides of debt and monetary stimulus may create more purchasing power than there are goods and services to purchase. Therefore, we are striving to avoid low-interest bonds and other investments that expose us to the risk of loss from inflation.

Our most recent additions to the “buy list” reflect favorable valuations in companies we believe to be durable—and fundamental to our lives. We will still require food and shelter and medicine in the future; finding bargain prices in profitable, dividend-paying providers is a joy.

We have revised an older theme—airlines and related companies—to focus on those with the most durable balance sheets. The airline industry has faced new challenges in the pandemic, and an industry under stress presents an opportunity… but we need the companies to survive in order to live through the current difficulties. (Hence the focus on only the strongest.)

Certain natural resource holdings have become market darlings. We began investing in them years ago, sometimes adding at lower prices as we waited for the turn to come. Our patience is being rewarded, and we believe this theme has years to run.

This is not a comprehensive list, of course, but covers some of the dominant themes we are seeing today.

Clients, if you would like to discuss these or offer additional ideas, please email us or call.


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Time to Get Off the Ride

We’ve all heard the basic maxim of investing: “Buy low, sell high.” And at 228Main.com, we have talked repeatedly about the perils of buying high or selling low. Just last week we asked, “Where are you on the ride?”

It is true that buying high or selling low can easily hurt you, and to avoid acting rashly, you do need to be able to recognize where you might be in a cycle.

The flip side may be true, too: you also need to be able to make timely moves when the time is ripe. Our philosophy focuses on value investing, and we are fortunate enough that you, our clients and readers, have internalized many of these notions. (So you know that we are not talking about “timing the market.”)

So the “buy low” part is relatively easy: hunting for bargains is fun and exciting! It is easy to look at a company trading at depressed prices and imagine the possibilities, even as you know that they may not necessarily come to pass.

The other part—”sell high”—is more difficult. A holding that has treated you well can be hard to get rid of. It is easy to get greedy and let it keep riding in the hopes of further returns.

But what goes up must come down. The more inflated prices get, the less sustainable they are. When prices enter an unsustainable bubble it is wise to protect your gains by selling while the selling is good.

This does not have to be an all-or-nothing process, though. You might still believe in a company’s long-term story even if prices look unrealistically high right now, in the short term. In this case it might make sense to hedge your bets by only selling part of your holdings. This lets you pocket some gains while keeping some exposure in case of future growth.

This becomes especially important when you have a high-flying investment. If certain holdings are outperforming the rest of your portfolio, they may swell up to become oversized relative to the rest of your holdings. Over time you may find yourself with too many of your eggs in one basket; periodically rebalancing away from a hot streak can help spread your risk around.

Of course, there are no guarantees. None of these strategies are magic. But letting your investments ride with a few big winners can leave them vulnerable to a big tanking at even a hint of bad news. Heck even totally decent news can spell a crash for a hot stock that’s being held up by unrealistic growth expectations.

How do we know when it’s time to get off the ride? Clients, when you have questions or concerns about your holdings, please call or email as always.


Content in this material is for general information only and not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual.

All investing involves risk including loss of principal. No strategy assures success or protects against loss. There is no guarantee that a diversified portfolio will enhance overall returns or outperform a non-diversified portfolio. Diversification does not protect against market risk.

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Some say the seeds of future gains are planted in the downturns. The future is always uncertain, but the past is not: we know many investments can be owned for less money today than last month or last year.

As we go about our work, we are seeking three kinds of bargains.

  • Great companies available at good prices.
  • Cyclical companies at low points in their cycle.
  • The best bargains in the investment universe, wherever they are.

Often, the companies we most admire seem expensive. We know farmers that are always excited to talk about buying their favorite iconic tractor maker. We hear the same thing from parents about the entertainment conglomerate that makes the movies and runs the theme parks their children enjoy. Downturns sometimes reduce stock prices to attractive levels.

Everyone knows that recessions usually hurt company revenues and profits. We are thinking how the inevitable recovery might improve revenues and profits. That long view improves our appetite for temporarily depressed cyclical companies.

Some of our favorite past bargains have come from the sector politely known as “high yield bonds.” (You and I can use a more descriptive term, junk bonds.) From time to time, at rare intervals over the past twenty years, we have found something we believed to be investable hiding in the junk pile. Times might be ripe for that again.

Now is the time. We are studying and thinking and researching to make the most of it.

Clients, if you would like to talk about this or anything else, please email us or call.