the best clients in the world

Defining Our Terms: Who Is “the Investor Class”?

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Theorists who study classes—whether they are economic, social, or political classes—have to be particular about the definitions and assumptions that inform their work. Without getting on the same page first, phrases like “middle class” would tell us practically nothing (except that maybe members are above some lower class and below some upper class?). 

We’ve recently been reminded of a term that’s now a few decades old: people talk about “the investor class,” or the group that has access to and takes advantage of stock ownership. 

In the past, the push to grow this “class” had political motivations. (The thinking went that if more of the electorate participated in the stock market, those voters would develop a new appreciation for certain policy goals regarding wealth and business.) 

So what defines this group, today? Who is “the investor class”? 

We can’t speak for all shops, but we already know who our clients. The portion of the “investor class” we work with is made up of, well, retirees and workers and truck drivers and executives and nurses and engineers and young teachers and former teachers and accountants and statisticians. 

They are married couples and widows and single people. They live in the Midwest and outside the Midwest. 

Some went to college. Some went beyond college. Some are high school graduates.  

Some start their investment journey with traditional pension plan contributions. Some start later in life when a sudden windfall arrives. 

Some like saving. Some like spending. 

At first glance, this may seem to be a poorly defined group. But hey… we’re talking about the work of growing your buckets, not anthropology or sociology. 

One characteristic does give structure to our definition of “the investor class”this group’s members are those people in the best position to profit from it over the long haul. In this niche market of the mind, we share a desire to own a piece of the action, in the form of shares of common stock, from nearly all sectors of the economy.  

Interested in this special but not-so-exclusive club? The barriers for entry have never been lower, and we’re glad to try to help anybody who wants to be here.  

Let’s talk: please email us or call. 


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Small, Boring, and Extraordinary

We talk a lot about plans and planning. Your goals, your situation are at the center of our work. And they have to be: that’s the whole point.

But you didn’t become the best clients in the whole world overnight. It’s been a journey of change for us and for you. So how did we do it? How did we build relationships where we can navigate change, monitor the conditions around us with clear eyes, and adjust when needed?

We didn’t leap off any cliffs together. We didn’t burn it all down. We didn’t do anything drastic. “Rome wasn’t built in a day,” the saying goes—and neither is a solid financial life.

We don’t look at a goal—retirement, for example—and expect that one big, amazing deal is going to land a pot of gold in our laps. But we also aren’t going to scratch our heads and wonder how we’re going to magically produce that pot of gold.

Creative Julia Cameron explains, “When we allow ourselves to wallow in the big questions, we fail to find the small answers.” (In fact, her book The Artist’s Way is all about showing up every day, putting in the work.)

Good work often means doing the small, boring bits—over and over. We show up for work. We make sure our savings plan gets executed every payday. We reevaluate our holdings as conditions change. We read, research, and chat.

Clients, our partnership is not a series of grand gestures. But it is a series of respectful connections. As Cameron would put it, it’s about “respect for where we are as well as where we wish to go.”

That is how we grow, together. And we actually think the small, boring moves can build something pretty extraordinary.

Please, write or call when we can be of service.

Honestly, It’s Not For Everyone

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Louisville, Nebraska has been the home of our business even before we moved into the office at 228 Main. It was our family home for many years before I started my practice, and it was from that home office that I struck out into business on my own.

I have mixed feelings about the great state of Nebraska. I enjoy seeing all of the friendly faces I know and love, and I look forward to many more days working in beautiful downtown Louisville. I do not look forward to spending several dozen more winters in Nebraska, but as you probably know, I have ways around that.

Nebraska’s tourism commission just unveiled a new ad campaign that embraces some of these feelings, announcing “Nebraska: Honestly, it’s not for everyone.”

Perhaps this slogan explains why the state is so near and dear to our hearts. We do not put much stock in advertising, but if we did, “it’s not for everyone” would be an apt slogan for our own business.

We are contrarians by nature. We like to think that we know what we are about, and through our communications, we hope we can give you some idea of what we are about as well. We do not have a lot of time to spend trying to be anything else. We know we are not always going to be a good fit, and would rather work with those we are than try to be everything to everybody.

We are definitely not for everyone. We do not want to be in business with everyone; we want to be in business with the best clients in the world. In our opinion, we are lucky enough to have found them.

Clients, if you want to discuss anything, please email us or call.


The opinions voiced in this material are for general information only and are not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual.

All investing involves risk including loss of principal. No strategy assures success or protects against loss.